Pinterest is all about the visuals.

When I first started blogging, I thought I knew what my pins should look like. I used cutesy-font, a different color font and/or background, depending on what mood I was in and sizes that were all over the place.

While I don’t suggest doing this on a consistent basis, there was an upside to all the chaos: I quickly figured out what worked…and what didn’t.

I was A/B testing before I even knew what that meant.

Why is A/B testing on Pinterest important?

If you’re just starting out or if you’ve been in the game for several years, you must A/B test your images.

Why?

Because that’s how you figure out what’s working.

That pin you created a year ago may not be the best option for you today. By testing out different styles, you’re testing what your audience wants and adapting to what drives the most results. Whether it’s page view, email signups or repins, A/B testing is one of the best ways to determine what your audience is lovin’ and what falls flat.

Where should you start with A/B testing on Pinterest?

If this is new territory for you, the easiest way to jump into this whole A/B testing thing is to create two graphics for one post: one with text overlay and one without.

Once your post is live, pin them to the same boards and see which one takes off. If the post is already published, consider making two new graphics and see which one performs better. You probably don’t want to be spammy, so consider scheduling them out on Tailwind using my favorite board list technique!

If you’re in the DIY niche, another great option for A/B testing images is to create an in-progress pin and a finished pin. The in-progress ones are usually great for grabbing a user’s attention and getting them to click over to your blog to see the finished result. On the flip side, pretty pictures are so popular and who doesn’t love seeing something when it’s complete and beautiful?

Advanced A/B testing on Pinterest

Once you’ve mastered the two common A/B testing options for your Pinterest, you can zero in even further on different ways to test image performance.

  • If you’re debating about the which phrase will be the best attention-grabber, try them both out
  • If you have a main color you use for fonts or background, switch it up and try something new.
  • Play around with various sizing; you may even find that some users like the horizontal images.
  • Alter the Pinterest text description and see if a catchy headline draws more attention.

The possibilities are limitless but please don’t get overwhelmed! These “tests” can be as easy or as technical as you want them to be.

The main takeaway: Never. Stop. Testing.

Happy pinning, friends!

Best,

Pin for later!

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